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Washington, DC 20024
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Ellen McCarthy
Acting Director, Office of Planning

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Ward 5


Ward 5 is extremely diverse in character and history, ranging from quiet residential neighborhoods and local shopping streets, to new high-rise development and industrial uses. The Brookland neighborhood sits in the middle of the ward in the northeast quadrant. Developed as a commuter rail village in the late 19th century, it is full of charming Victorian homes and a number of Catholic institutions such as Catholic University of America and the Franciscan Monastery of the Holy Land in America (pictured at right). Brookland gives way to early 20th century bungalow neighborhoods such as Michigan Park to the north and Woodridge to the east. 

To the west, neighborhoods such as Eckington and Bloomingdale, on either side of North Capitol Street, are more typical of the townhouse neighborhoods of central Washington, DC. To the south, Trinidad and Carver Langston are dominated by 20th century porch-front townhouses. To the east, Fort Lincoln is a modern “new town” development, with a mix of townhouses and apartments from the 1960s and 1970s. Ward 5 has a great deal of both industrial land and open space. Florida Avenue Market is the city’s wholesale center, with other industrial spaces in Eckington and Fort Totten, and along the railroad tracks, New York Avenue and Bladensburg Road. The Ward is also home to the rolling hills of the National Arboretum and the great lawns of the U.S. Soldiers’ and Airmen’s Home. The northern portion of the NoMA neighborhood sits within Ward 5, and a number of mixed-use, high-rise developments are finished or in the works, bringing a bit of the hustle and bustle of downtown to the ward.

For more information on the planning, development review, and historic preservations initiatives in the ward, please visit the links below or contact Deborah L Crain Kemp, Ward 5 neighborhood planner 202-442-7600,deborahlcrain.kemp@dc.gov.

Related Documents

 


Brookland Beautification Small Grant Program

DC Office of Planning with Dance Place Launch the Brookland Beautification Small Grant Program

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Riggs Road and South Dakota Avenue Area Development Plan

The goal of this plan was to assess neighborhood conditions, develop a vision for revitalization and provide a framework to guide future growth and development in the area surrounding the Riggs Road and South Dakota Avenue intersection.

View more »